The Power of FAITH

faith

For most of her adolescence, 17-year-old Faith Garcia was angry. “I didn’t listen to anybody,” says Faith. “Basically, I did what I wanted. I was always with the wrong crowd, and doing everything wrong. I would choose my friends over everything – even over school.”

Years of negative peer pressure and self-destructive behavior culminated in a serious incident at Faith’s school. She was arrested for assaulting an authority figure on campus – but even after this dramatic incident, she was given another chance. However, she continued to stray down the wrong path and was arrested again – this time on criminal mischief charges for a separate incident off campus. Faith found herself in the juvenile justice courtroom standing before Bexar County Judge Laura Parker, an experience she would later say was a personal turning point.

Judge Parker’s court is better known as the Crossroads Girls Mental Health Court, which works closely with the BCFS Health and Human Services-San Antonio KAPS program, or Kids Averted from Placement Services. BCFS-San Antonio KAPS and Crossroads work in tandem to provide young women in the juvenile justice system with case management, counseling, life skills training, job search assistance and educational services. The goal is to help them avoid repeating their past transgressions, and build a brighter future.

One of the most unconventional components of the program turned out to be the most impactful for Faith: equine therapy and horseback riding. She enjoyed connecting with the calm, majestic animals and being outdoors. Through equine therapy, plus intensive writing workshops, Faith learned to redirect her anger and calm her destructive impulses.

“They told us that the horses pick up on who you are, and what your attitudes are like. At first, I was scared, but then I just talked to it and said ‘I’m not going to hurt you.’ My anger calmed down because they made me write it all on paper, or work with animals – things that I don’t get to do regularly.”

Faith did so well in the program that when she graduated, BCFS staff asked her to return to mentor other girls. Today, she’s preparing to graduate high school and pursue her dream to become a firefighter.

Faith uses her past to motivate her younger brother and sister to make wise choices. “I tell them, ‘You see how I was,’ and they’re nothing like me,” says Faith. She warns them to not be controlled by others and avoid the pitfalls of drugs and alcohol, sentiments she learned from her mother and stepfather.

“It put me in a place where I’m more calm,” Faith says of KAPS/ Crossroads. “If I get angry, it’s on me. I’m the one that’s going to pay the consequences.”

Words of wisdom Faith received from her strict but loving stepdad, Moises Martir, helped change her outlook:

“Your friends are not the ones that are going to be controlling your life, later. They’re going to be the ones walking when you’re stuck back here. You don’t need to be like other people, you need to be yourself. You need to learn how to control yourself and push through.”

In 2016, the Crossroads Girls Mental Health Court won the National Criminal Justice Association’s Outstanding Criminal Justice Program Award for the Western Region

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